Southern Foodways' Mississippi Delta Hot Tamales

The recipe Southern Foodways' Mississippi Delta Hot Tamales is ready in around 3 hours and 30 minutes and is definitely an excellent gluten free and dairy free option for lovers of Southern food. One portion of this dish contains about 9g of protein, 3g of fat, and a total of 67 calories. For 41 cents per serving, this recipe covers 5% of your daily requirements of vitamins and minerals. This recipe serves 84. Several people really liked this hor d'oeuvre. 143 people found this recipe to be flavorful and satisfying. A mixture of garlic powder, black pepper, maseca, and a handful of other ingredients are all it takes to make this recipe so tasty. It is brought to you by Serious Eats. Taking all factors into account, this recipe earns a spoonacular score of 32%, which is not so excellent. If you like this recipe, you might also like recipes such as Delta Tamales, Southern Comfort" Bacon Hot Dog with Southern Slaw, and Mississippi Mud Cake + A Giveaway of Paula Deen’s Southern Cooking Bible! – CLOSED.

Servings: 84

 

Ingredients:

4 teaspoons baking powder

2 teaspoons black pepper

¼ cup chili powder

1 to 2 packages dried corn husks

1 tablespoon garlic powder

1 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper

1 teaspoon ground cumin

6 to 8 cups warm meat broth (from cooking the meat)

6 to 8 pounds boneless meat (pork shoulder, chuck roast, or chicken)

1 tablespoon onion powder

2 tablespoons paprika

2 teaspoons salt

¾ cup vegetable oil

8 cups maseca (masa mix) or yellow cornmeal

Equipment:

pot

bowl

baking sheet

kitchen twine

steamer basket

Cooking instruction summary:

Procedures 1 To make the meat filling: Cut the meat into large chunks and place in a large, heavy pot. Cover with cold water. Bring to a boil over high heat. Cover the pot, reduce the heat to medium-low, and simmer until the meat is very tender, 2 to 2½ hours. Remove the meat and reserve the cooking liquid. When the meat is cool enough to handle, remove and discard any skin or large chunks of fat. Shred or dice the meat into small pieces. There should be about 14 to 16 cups of meat. Heat the vegetable oil in a large, heavy pot over medium heat. Stir in the chili powder, paprika, salt, pepper, cayenne, onion powder, garlic powder, and cumin. Add the meat and stir to coat with the oil and spices. Cook, stirring often, until the meat is warmed through, 7 to 10 minutes. Set aside. 2 To prepare the corn husks: While the meat is cooking, soak the husks in a large bowl or sink of very warm water, until they are softened and pliable, about 2 hours. Gently separate the husks into single leaves, trying not to tear them. Wash off any dust and discard any corn silks. Keep any shucks that split to the side, since two small pieces can be overlapped and used as one. 3 To make the masa dough: Stir the maseca, baking powder, salt, and lard together in a large bowl until well blended. Gradually stir in enough warm broth (from cooking the meat) to make soft, spongy dough that is the consistency of thick mashed potatoes. The dough should be moist but not wet. Cover the bowl with a damp cloth. 4 To assemble the tamales: Remove a corn husk from the water and pat it dry. Lay the husk on a work surface. Spread about ¼ cup of the masa in an even layer across the wide end of the husk to within 1 inch of the edges. Spoon about 1 tablespoon of the meat mixture in a line down the center of the masa. Roll the husk so that the masa dough surrounds the filling and forms a cylinder or package. Fold the husk under to close the bottom and complete the package. Place the completed tamales in a single layer on a baking sheet. Repeat until all the masa and filling is used. Simmer or steam the tamales. 5 To simmer: Stand the tamales upright, closed side down, in a large pot. Place enough tamales in the pot so that they do not fall over or come unrolled, or tie the bundle together with kitchen twine. Carefully fill the pot with enough water to come just to the top of the tamales, trying not to pour water directly onto the tamales. Bring the water to a boil over high heat. Cover the pot, reduce the heat to medium-low, and simmer until the masa is firm and pulls away from the husk easily and cleanly, about 1 hour. 6 To steam: Stand the tamales upright, closed side down, in a large steamer basket. Cover the tamales with a damp towel or additional husks. Steam the tamales over simmering water until the masa is firm and pulls away from the husk easily and cleanly, about 1 to 1¼ hours. Serve the tamales warm, in their husks.

 

Step by step:

To make the meat filling

1. Cut the meat into large chunks and place in a large, heavy pot. Cover with cold water. Bring to a boil over high heat. Cover the pot, reduce the heat to medium-low, and simmer until the meat is very tender, 2 to 2½ hours.

2. Remove the meat and reserve the cooking liquid. When the meat is cool enough to handle, remove and discard any skin or large chunks of fat. Shred or dice the meat into small pieces. There should be about 14 to 16 cups of meat.

3. Heat the vegetable oil in a large, heavy pot over medium heat. Stir in the chili powder, paprika, salt, pepper, cayenne, onion powder, garlic powder, and cumin.

4. Add the meat and stir to coat with the oil and spices. Cook, stirring often, until the meat is warmed through, 7 to 10 minutes. Set aside.

5. To prepare the corn husks: While the meat is cooking, soak the husks in a large bowl or sink of very warm water, until they are softened and pliable, about 2 hours. Gently separate the husks into single leaves, trying not to tear them. Wash off any dust and discard any corn silks. Keep any shucks that split to the side, since two small pieces can be overlapped and used as one.

6. To make the masa dough: Stir the maseca, baking powder, salt, and lard together in a large bowl until well blended. Gradually stir in enough warm broth (from cooking the meat) to make soft, spongy dough that is the consistency of thick mashed potatoes. The dough should be moist but not wet. Cover the bowl with a damp cloth.


To assemble the tamales

1. Remove a corn husk from the water and pat it dry. Lay the husk on a work surface.

2. Spread about ¼ cup of the masa in an even layer across the wide end of the husk to within 1 inch of the edges. Spoon about 1 tablespoon of the meat mixture in a line down the center of the masa.

3. Roll the husk so that the masa dough surrounds the filling and forms a cylinder or package. Fold the husk under to close the bottom and complete the package.

4. Place the completed tamales in a single layer on a baking sheet. Repeat until all the masa and filling is used. Simmer or steam the tamales.

5. To simmer: Stand the tamales upright, closed side down, in a large pot.

6. Place enough tamales in the pot so that they do not fall over or come unrolled, or tie the bundle together with kitchen twine. Carefully fill the pot with enough water to come just to the top of the tamales, trying not to pour water directly onto the tamales. Bring the water to a boil over high heat. Cover the pot, reduce the heat to medium-low, and simmer until the masa is firm and pulls away from the husk easily and cleanly, about 1 hour.

7. To steam: Stand the tamales upright, closed side down, in a large steamer basket. Cover the tamales with a damp towel or additional husks. Steam the tamales over simmering water until the masa is firm and pulls away from the husk easily and cleanly, about 1 to 1¼ hours.

8. Serve the tamales warm, in their husks.


Nutrition Information:

Quickview
69k Calories
9g Protein
3g Total Fat
0.72g Carbs
2% Health Score
Limit These
Calories
69k
3%

Fat
3g
5%

  Saturated Fat
1g
12%

Carbohydrates
0.72g
0%

  Sugar
0.08g
0%

Cholesterol
27mg
9%

Sodium
117mg
5%

Get Enough Of These
Protein
9g
19%

Vitamin B3
4mg
23%

Selenium
13µg
20%

Vitamin B6
0.34mg
17%

Phosphorus
107mg
11%

Vitamin A
314IU
6%

Vitamin B5
0.63mg
6%

Potassium
199mg
6%

Magnesium
12mg
3%

Vitamin E
0.48mg
3%

Vitamin B2
0.05mg
3%

Vitamin B1
0.03mg
2%

Iron
0.36mg
2%

Zinc
0.3mg
2%

Manganese
0.03mg
2%

Vitamin K
1µg
1%

Vitamin B12
0.09µg
1%

Fiber
0.35g
1%

Calcium
14mg
1%

Copper
0.02mg
1%

covered percent of daily need
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Food Trivia

The oldest evidence for soup is from 6,000 B.C. and calls for hippopotamus and sparrow meat.

Food Joke

Wu`s Coffee Abraham Grossman, the rich young bachelor, is entertaining a gorgeous woman, Gloria, with dinner in his penthouse. As his Chinese servant pours the coffee, Gloria asks, "Wu, how do you make such delicious coffee?" "Me take plenty boiled water," explains Wu, "and stir in coffee, velly, velly slow." "Yes," says Gloria, "but it is so clear. How do you strain it so cleverly?" "Me take master’s silk socks..." begins Wu. "What!" shouts Grossman. "You take my best silk socks to strain the coffee?" "Oh, no, master," replies Wu. "Me never take master’s clean socks."

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